Robert Macomber, Code of Honor

Wednesday, June 8, 2022

No charge
Reservations Required

Patrons may choose to attend this event in-person or remotely via a livestreamed presentation. For those who prefer to view the event from home, please register for the virtual option. After registering, you will receive an email with instructions on how to view the presentation.

Robert N. Macomber is an award-winning writer, accomplished seaman, and internationally acclaimed lecturer. Macomber tantalizes audiences with factual historic lore and literary tales and is best known for his novels in the “Honor Series”. The popular maritime thrillers follow fictional American naval officer Peter Wake who serves in America’s first espionage agency from the Civil War to 1908.The novels illuminate the U.S. Navy’s critical role in the expansion of America from a continental country to a global power.

On a hot June day in 1904, the Russo-Japanese War is raging in Korea and Rear Admiral Peter Wake, forty-year veteran of naval espionage, ship combat, and guerilla wars, is in his White House office as special assistant to President Theodore Roosevelt. The Perdicaris Hostage Crisis in Morocco has diverted Wake from his critical main project: obtaining Imperial Germany’s 1903 revised invasion plans against the United States. After defusing the hostage mess, Wake and his unique team head for Hamburg and St. Petersburg in grand style on a diplomatic mission. But that’s merely a façade for the false-flag operation to get those German plans.

Even as Wake hobnobs with Kaiser Wilhelm II and Czar Nicholas II, he reconnects with contacts in the sordid world of intelligence. In a perilous evening in St. Petersburg, Wake is trapped by the dreaded Russian Okhrana into joining the Russian fleet as a neutral observer on their 18,000-mile voyage around the world to engage the vastly superior Japanese fleet—a certain death sentence.

Wake’s subsequent trek around Europe, Africa, and Asia leads him into the clutches of the Japanese Black Dragon Society; the cataclysmic Battle of Tsushima, which changed world history; the chaotic Trans-Siberian Railway and Potemkin Mutiny in the 1905 Russian Revolution; the Portsmouth Naval Station peace talks; the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize in Norway—and many different codes of honor.

Florida Voices in generously supported by the Fred J. Brotherton Endowment for Literature, established at The Four Arts by the Fred J. Brotherton Charitable Foundation. Fred Brotherton, who died in 2003, was for many years a Benefactor of The Four Arts and a strong supporter of its programs. Florida Voices, featuring the state that was Mr. Brotherton’s winter home, serves as a continuing memorial to this much-respected member of The Four Arts.

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